Have spent the last few weeks preparing for a 10-week workplace wellness program that I have the honor of facilitating. I've never used someone else's PowerPoint before, and although encouraged to modify it to fit my style, I really want to maintain the program's integrity and be as true to it as possible.

http://static.typepad.com/.shared:va4a342c:typepad:en_us/images/yui/skins/tp1/editor/extended-separator.png); background-color: transparent; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;"> Hence, I've been re-reading lots of the research and articles on Health At Every Size® to allow the facts and figures that aren't usually in my talks to lilt off my tongue. Given my memory, that's an unlikely outcome via just a few re-visits, but at least I'll know where to find the information if questioned.

Because of my Internet searches (and thanks to a number of list serves to which I belong) I happened upon a lovely blog post written by Dale Favier, a massage therapist.

It was a joy to read these words:

Let’s start here with what nobody looks like: nobody looks like the people in magazines or movies. Not even models. Nobody. Lean people have a kind of rawboned, unfinished look about them that is very appealing. But they don’t have plump round breasts and plump round asses. You have plump round breasts and a plump round ass, you have a plump round belly and plump round thighs as well. That’s how it works. (And that’s very appealing too.)
Women have cellulite. All of them. It’s dimply and cute. It’s not a defect. It’s not a health problem. It’s the natural consequence of not consisting of photoshopped pixels, and not having emerged from an airbrush.
I encourage you to click on the links included in the quote above--they are excellent. The first is to a recent Lifestyle commentary by Carré Otis, where she tells the truth of what it's like to be a model (including the eating disordered behavior used to maintain her abnormally skinny body). Otis ends her article by declaring:
Today, thankfully, my happiness has nothing to do with my weight or feedback from others. And perfection of any kind is no longer the goal. The notion that perfection can be achieved is a lie we are told and a lie we tell ourselves. That's the ugly truth. I wish I could've told those young fans what I've finally learnt to tell myself: reality - imperfection - is where the real beauty is.
The second link goes to a piece titled, "Cellulite: It's time we all just get the hell over it." Pretty self-explanatory.
 
Favier goes on to more fully describe the bodies he's worked on, ending with this proclamation, "I’ll tell you what people look like, really: they look like flames. Or like the stars, on a clear night in the wilderness."

Beautiful. 

"Health At Every Size is a registered trademark of the Association for Size Diversity and Health and used with permission."

[Originally posted on the Gürze Books Eating Disorders Blogs]